Home > About Fuji Xerox > Sustainability Report 2016 > Relationships with Stakeholders > Relationship with Global Environment > Integrated Recycling System > New Manufacturing Style: "Integrated Recycling System" > Separation of Hazardous Substances/Materials and Thermal Recycling

Separation of Hazardous Substances/Materials and Thermal Recycling

With conventional materials recycling that focused mainly on metals such as iron, landfill waste was produced from the used products that were collected.

At Fuji Xerox, we decided to aim at achieving as close to "zero landfill" as possible, and in the fall of 1998, with the cooperation of 13 recycling companies across Japan possessing the latest technologies, we disassembled 100 used copy machines that had been collected for recycling weighing a total of approximately 18 tons, to separate them into individual parts, and disassemble them into materials. This was our demonstration test for "zero landfill" to recycle collected used products completely back into usable resources.

At Fuji Xerox, we decided to aim at achieving as close to zero landfill" as possible, and in the fall of 1998, with the cooperation of 13 recycling companies across Japan possessing the latest technologies, we disassembled 100 used copy machines that had been collected for recycling weighing a total of approximately 18 tons, to separate them into individual parts, and disassemble them into materials. This was our demonstration test for "zero landfill" to recycle collected used products completely back into usable resources.

The results of this test confirmed that zero landfill could be realized, by separating each of the used copy machines parts into a maximum of 44 categories, and by processing each of these through the latest recycling process.

Starting in February 1999, this process was put into practice at our Ebina Facility for parts that were disassembled in the recycling line Note 1 but could not be reused. Through this, the process from disassembly and separation to recycling was systemized as a management system. In addition, a site that studies and verifies the efficiency of the disassembly and separation operations called Ecoland was also built within the same Ebina Facility.

Fuji Xerox started disassembling and separating used machines collected by the company in the Tokyo metropolitan area. Furthermore, in order to expand the "zero-landfill" system to the national level, we created a network of recycling companies (23 companies nationwide) that possess the same level of technology as that used in the demonstration test.

As a result, a system for realizing "zero-landfill" (excluding process losses) for used productscollected from customers was rolled-out nationwide in August 2000.

Separation of Hazardous Substances/Materials and Thermal Recycling

Components of Zero Landfill from the 100% Recycling Processing System